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with it. we have teamed up with the minnesota department of commerce to give back free, yes free, money. right in the middle of the mall. >> you guys want to find some money? >> reporter: there's just one problem. >> want some money? you sure. >> reporter: these skeptical shoppers don't believe us. >> we got thousands of dollars. millions of dollars. >> reporter: but they should. statistics show 1 in 10 of us have unclaimed money waiting. forgotten apartment security deposits. final paychecks that you didn't pick up and money left to you from loved ones. minnesota commerce department chair loves giving it back. >> you never know, it could be $1,000 or tens of thousands of dollars that's your money. >> reporter: katy westin is one of the doubters. can we change her mind? yes. with a nice find. $675 for from her extended family if other see the hubbub and start to line up at at the station. she searched her grandmother's name. >> 1625. >> reporter: wow. >> she's retired. >> reporter: jason bennett checked his mom's name and found $2,600 in insurance money. >> spend it on the grand kids. >
of regulations, many more could follow. business groups like chairman ber of commerce are try -- chamber of commerce are trying to warn voters about it, is it trtoo late, after this. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ so let's talk about coverage. based on this chart, who would you choose ? wow. you guys take a minute. zon, hands down. i'm going to show you guys another chart. pretty obvious. i don't think color matters. pretty obvious. what'sretty obvious about it ? that verizon has the coverage. verin. verizon. we're going to go to another chart. it doesn't really matter how you present it. it doesn't matter how you present it. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. >> he in
department of commerce to give back free, yes, free money right in the middle of the mall. >> you guys want to find some money? >> reporter: there's just one problem. >> do you want some money? are you sure? >> reporter: these skeptical shoppers don't believe us. >> you guys want to look up unclaimed property and see if you have any money waiting for you. we got thousands of dollars. millions of dollars. >> reporter: but they should. statistics show one in ten of us has unclaimed money waiting. it comes from things like forgotten apartment security deposits, final paychecks you didn't pick up and money left to you by loved ones. the states hold it for their citizens. minnesota commerce commissioner mike rothman loves giving it back. >> check, if there's nothing there, fine, but you never know. it could be a hundred dollars. a thousand dollars or tens of thousands of dollars that's your money. >> there you go. >> reporter: kathy westin is one of the doubters. can we change her mind? >> yes. whoo-h whoo-hoo. >> reporter: yes, with a nice find, $675 for her extended family. >> i'm very happy.
the hour-long debate, including iran, women's rights, and economic policy. >> the u.s. chamber of commerce said professor warns tax policies and her approach to them are the greatest threat to free enterprise. it is said it would cut 700,000 jobs, 17,000 in massachusetts. these are independent groups who have analyzed and pointed this out. i am going to protect the hard- working men and women, the job creators, the people getting up in the middle of the night and creating jobs. >> i think the point here is the chamber of commerce has not talked about my particular proposals. what i am talking about is how scott brown has already voted and also talking about what he said in his own voice last week that it wanted to make crystal clear. and that is that he would like taxes go up for 90% of families in order to protect tax breaks for the top 2%. >> in an appearance on the spanish-language network on thursday, president obama faced tough questions over his immigration policies. including his failure to fulfill a campaign promise to enact comprehensive immigration reform during his first your of
east, probably saved two million people from starvation, and was a very energetic secretary of commerce under harding and coolidge after this election. but in terms of personality, dower, pragmatic. you listen to -- one of the reasons why i think franklin roosevelt comes across like gangbusters, is impression with the fireside chats is the act he is following. after herbert hoover, anybody could have sounded good. >> host: moving on to be 1948. harry truman's improbable victory, published last year. you write: victory has a thousand fathers. defeat, in 1946, had one. harry truman. if he appeared ineffectual before election day that year he seemed outright repulsive after that. democrats faulted him and not the effect of 16 years of their rule for their debacle. they wanted him out and wanted him out now. >> guest: yes, they did. he was not -- we saw in this last presidential round of primaries, with the'mans, where everybody was saying i'm the next reagan, this guy -- no. there's not another reagan. and there wasn't another franklin roosevelt, and harry truman sure as hell to use his s
-owned businesses in india. india's commerce department says the move will help with the slowing economy there. the markets are soaring in america. shows you what a little stimulus can do. if only it was as easy to stimulate the economy of the eurozone. but maybe all that bond-buying is doing some good. that was talked about in a 2-day meeting in cyprus that began friday. let's talk with greg hadley. he's president of the bull & bear institute. in regard to what's been going on in europe, are you bullish or bearish? > > you know what, i'm a little bit of both. if you look at it, the ecb, by buying up the short-term notes of basically the pigs, greece- > > that's a key point, though: they're buying the short-term notes. > > it's the short-term notes, which really has been the problem for these countries, is how do they get the short-term financing to continue their governments? they are looking at it, and basically this is a short-term fix on a long-term problem. the structural problems in the eurozone will continue to exist. in fact, right now greece is asking whether or not they should renego
like chairman ber of commerce are try -- chamber o >> he indicated he wants to raise taxes could raising taxes on a small business, that will kill jobs, the president is pore owing borrowing a trillion dolls more we take every year, a pathway that looks more european than american, many are drawn to, i think they are wrong, they do not recognize it is not good for america at large, 100% of americans in my view will do much better if we live by a government established by founding fathers, one based upon freed am anfreedom and opportun. neil: charlie -- charlie gasparino on the phone with me, saying that is not just all obama all the time. charlie, explain that. why do you think that the supposition he lost half of the country is wrong. >> break down who is in that 47%, a lot of people to believe that big government is the way to go. maybe economically say subsift on welfare. but a lot of people in that 47% are people that want to preserve their paycheck that excuse mes from government pensions, cop, firemen, other retirees, they understand that the enormous growth of the welfare
, transnational crime and terrorism, enhancing commerce between nations and dealing with climate change. it requires courage and leadership to take the first step to a mutual understanding. i've been particularly impressed recently with juan manuel santos, the president of colombia, as he reaches out to two of his neighbors to restore diplomatic relations. .. against the people of cuba and that we display no interest in furthering or improving diplomatic relations. all us should continue to press the cuban government but the embargo undermines any credibility that my country has in calling for improvements in cuba. and i fear our democracy-aid program is aimed at regime change and does not promote democracy. unfortunately, the program is used by some in cuba to justify cuban-american gross who i know might believe to be innocent and keep him in prison. a more sincere diagnose should be held with -- the main reason that united states keeps cuba on the list is that because the et a have officers in cuba, but when i was last in havana, the columbian and the spanish told me that having them
with the consequences. ashley: right over the top. and facebook is getting into the e-commerce business. allowing you to send real gifts to your virtual friends but the question is, will it be a gift for company shareholders? we'll be asking an analyst. tracy: don't get that virtual stuff. anyway, top of the hour. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, we were just talking about it. spain kind of helping us back again today, huh? >> that's right. when we talk about spain again, spain again and that sometimes hits our markets but today we'll say it's spain again but in this case it is good news that the bank stress tests came in better-than-expected. they weren't as bad as they could have been. of course there are still banks that need to raise more capital and such but overall, it was pretty good news. so what you saw was that the dow came up off the lows. it almost hit that unchanged line. it was down over 100 points. we're looking at longer term charts here. this is a one-month chart. for the one-month we're up almost 3%. fo
or a store or some sort of commerce. >> they talk about first strike advantage. we were discussing online today google trucks who go through the streets and take pictures of street views. there was one in our neighborhood the other day. google has had a lot of time to not only refine their images, but their algorithms, right? so you can put in -- snet of for monte brothers, you put in bros and it's going to find it for you, jim. >> i love the way my house in summit looks on google. >> is it bigger? >> truly, you might say it's bigger. remember that? >> yes. how can i forget? >> the place i have in mexico, it has three angles, i found in my irish public book they directed me to some of the best publics and i was never lost once. that's my kind of device. >> it is. now you're going to get to the eiffel tower. >> in ireland. >> it's going work out well for you. >> it's a lingering question, though. there's no question that the demand for the iphone 5 is strong. there's a question about whether people will be satisfied because of the lcd sources, sharp was one of the three suppliers of the lc
's 20 years ago. 20 years ago. last year, just last year the u.s. chamber of commerce, 20 years later, came out with another study. this is the u.s. chamber of commerce. this is not the social scientists. these are hardheaded business people. what did they say in the u.s. chamber of commerce report? we've got to put more money spew preschoo -- moremoney into pres. well, we at the federal level have been doing that through a program called head start, and we've had head start, i think if i'm not mistaken, since about 1968. high-quality early childhood education has been proven to save taxpayer dollars in the long run by reducing the costs for welfare, special education, and, might i add, criminal justice. read that -- jail time. one of the highest correlative -- in fact, if i'm not mistaken, the highest correlative factor for people who are incarcerated in our prisons is the lack of a high school education. urn the romney-ryan budget, up to 200,000 low-income children and their families could lose access to head start, again, in fiscal year 2014. i'm not talking about over the next ten
association of manufacturers park chamber of commerce or state associations to get people, businesses concerned about this that have been benefiting from these tax incentives, and would see them come off. that is the debate he will see with any tax break coming off this. >> do you think you can go back to the chart that showed the scenarios? it is a complicated chart. the markets in areas. the one with all of the dots. as someone who covers congress and overseas our congressional coverage, i always think of the worst case scenario. congress either doing nothing or kicking the can down the road or doing some version of a -- economic decision with a box. coming up about that scenario? depending on the outcome of the election. there is a lot of scenarios. if we have a status quo election, obama wins, almost an equally divided republican senate and democratic house. then there's the of republican washington scenario. i did not think there is an all democratic washington scenario right now. what is possible versus what -- in the lame duck and then into generic -- january and how do the mar
budgets of the departments of commerce, education, energy, homeland security, interior, justice, state, plus the federal courts. so how is it that we're able to borrow so much money and pay so little interest on it? why aren't we like spain or italy or greece? if sorting out because we will manage our finances, or that we have a political system that seems to be a marvel of efficiency of compromise and comedy. it's because the rest of the world looks even worse. the united states is the world's tallest midget when it comes to borrowing money. if this could go on for ever, it would be fantastic. it is not going to go on forever. i have no clue when it's going to in but it's not going to go on forever. as interest rates return to normal, the share of the federal budget that goes to interest is going to rise. and that will crowd that spending on other things. it means they will pay taxes and will borrow money and some of the money would borrow will go to pay interest on the money we borrowed flashy. some of taxes we pay will go to pay interest to our creditors. and those creditors are inc
of chinese commerce. after weeks of going straight dow, the key shipping index has reverted sharply to the upside. the iron ore stocks are roaring too. now, look, i got enormous respect for the bears on china, led by tomorrow's "squawk box" sques jim chanos. he is one of the brightest i've ever met. i have no chinese stocks. have i from time to time, but no chinese stocks i think you should buy. i also think the chinese interest rates are way too high. the stimulus is too small to matter. all that said, the possibility that china isn't falling off a cliff could be good news for the world economy. if china stops decelerating, it would be a pleasant global surprise. you know i think the united states is the best place to invest in the world. i worry about europe's recession, japan's secular decline, india's inflation, and yes, china's deceleration. not to mention our own looming financial clift. well could conceively go to new highs. i think the u.s. issue is the most likely to be solved because it's about political will. but the green shoots out of china, they tell me stop being as n
, we opened up and created the dot com domain, and in it became a platform for e-commerce and essential services. in 1985 and at that we have the world wide web. now you can search for information and enabling more and more information communication technology innovation. in the coming years our government has embraced that for the hope of the economic growth, activity that it has enabled. and we started to put more and more of our special services on to the backbone of the internet. today, we have the bank and e-commerce all on the internet. we're moving toward a future of having our energy distribution, smart grid that is connected to the internet. we are moving to a generation of next-generation aviation and air traffic control that is controlled by the internet and over the internet. so we have moved so much are essential services onto the internet, and one has to ask is that what it was designed for, and is it secure or what we need for in the future? this brings about three tensions. i'm going to try to stick to three. three tensions that are in the technology world. the first is
to those reforms. we know that american businesses are faced with an unbelievably complicated and commerce and tax code, combined over 30% on businesses. not to mention the problems with the estate taxes. it makes the u.s. as the second highest corporate tax rate among developed nations in the world. and so the u.s. federal rate is 35%. it's nearly 10 percentage points higher than other -- our other competitors. so that on top of all of the other issues that we've highlighted, where in order to create -- know, i mentioned the manufacturing jobs. i don't know about you but i get this question all the time, where have all the manufacturing jobs gone. and people always highlight that we've just chased these jobs offshore and it's because we have created this environment in which business owners don't have a choice. if they're going to turn a profit they have to do what is the benefit for their families and to make that hard-earned llar. i remember hearing a colleague give an example, he was sitting on an airplane next to a guy that made things. he made things, he produced a product and he wan
of these issues. but the absolute core issue is bankers are meant to help service commerce, not be a barrier that gets in the way. >> reporter: so this commission will be looking at regulation and potential policy changes around uk banking. they'll report back with proposed legislation, coming into christmas. december 18th is when they're expected to report. lots more evidence expected to be reported. >> thank you so much. james ferguson is still with us. there's so much going on with the uk. what is interesting is we're trying to -- the uk is setting up its own regulations, whether we're heading into direct conflict with the what the eu might be proposing because they're going to rip up the eba and have extended powers over uk banks, whether we're heading for a collision here. >> if europe's problem is that everyone has the same policy but all have different fiscal policies, different tax rates, we've got the same issue potentially brug here with banking.ewing here with banking. if they have to be bailed out by the taxpayers, which tax pay sne ers? maybe we should make the decision whether
and they would be sing examining dancing if they had been as hoe as they are in inverted commerce. we caught up with some very academic important men in german, the academic mentor, and asked him some of these questions. for example, what the esm should look like and what the ecb could or could not do. here's what he had to say. >> the problem is that a change, the old friend of policymaking because up until now it was forbidden -- it was a rule not to buy bonds and you understand when they started in 2010 is, well, we have to buy some bonds simply to keep the market floating, to keep them flexible. but meanwhile, it's clear, this is not the idea. so, now the idea is simply to support governments. >> one of the problems of massive bond buying programs is that it knocks the whole market system out of sync, so to speak. it's much easier for governments to buy bonds. this is what the professor also warned about. >> the banks are really financing the governments at this time. and you see there is also specialty because if a bank gives a loan to a private company, then they have to have capital. if
of the indexes. you see bank of ireland up there and unicredit, commerce bank. >> yes, we do take some collective long positions. for example in italy where we see economy be more solid than in spain and not suffering from what spanish banks are exceeding. today the imf is supporting plan of investment from the esm into irish banks that would lighten up irish debt. there is a combination of bad policies aimeded a repping the regions and banks which are very large problems and structural problems in the economy like very high unemployment. so already a very bad macro situation, on top of that the government is persisting into policy stakes that haven't worked before. >> so selective risks. how about the noneurozone. banks. >> we've always been very positive because there's a better independent policy, many of these countries are a safe haven from the european crisis. on the other hand, the up side has become lower and lower has safe havens have become more popular. so the bonds from these banks now trade at half the extra spread than bonds in the semicore eurozone countries like france or the peri
and commerce bank are named. >> is the british public ready to sell their stake to a chinese company? i don't know. we're open for business, you but we need to see the profit on the table. >> the world's top designers have been showcasing their latest collections in london. i went down to check out the shows and find out just what the forecast is for the luxury market. asked vivian westwood where she sees pockets of growth. >> at the moment, it's in china. if you didn't have the chinese buying things, then the fashion business would be completely on the floor. it won't migrate to africa, you know. it's just not going to happen. by then, we'll be frying by then in this climate change. we've got to do things in between. if we do things in between, i don't know where we'll be in the future. but i have far too much product. the nation of the fashion business is that in order to support the nucleus of what you do, there are so many spinoffs that you have to have because it has to be subsidized by these spinoffs. what i do would lose money if it didn't up the spinoffs. i don't know. it's just a w
economy, what are you seeing? >> we know that china's commerce ministry called on japan to take complete responsibility for any trade fallout, but latest china fdi numbers show china has a lot to lose as well. japanese investment increased 16.2% in the first eight months. but that's much slower than the 50% increase in 2011. on the whole, down 1.4% on year, but that's higher than that of july. january to august, investment inflow declined 4.3% from the previous year. if you look at a breakdown, debt-plagued europe was the weak spot. investment from the u.s. declined 2.8%. foreign investment into the agricultural sector tumbled nearly 15% on year, but the silver lining was in the services sector, hired by over 5% on growing domestic demand. >> i want to thank you very much for sticking around and sharing your thoughts on everything happening. sixuan, we'll see you a little bit later in the program. >>> let's bring you up to speed where we are, just an hour and 15 minutes into trade. after losses yesterday, this is where we stand right now for european equity markets. there's a number of s
agree on the idea of a serious commerce asian centered on this document. since i mentioned amendments, i don't make too many predictions but i will say that most of the amendments, as a practical matter, have the support of both parties because it's hard to get two-thirds, two-thirds-3/4 without both parties being on board. the great amendments of the 1960's for example, the great iconic statutes of the 1960's and the civil rights acts of civic -- civil rights act of 64 and the voting rights act of 65 in a fair housing act of 68. republicans and democrats in the spirit that you're calling for and one of her thought since we are talking about our sponsoring institutions for this really extraordinary conversation, and that is the national archives. i think that the framers of the constitution who would amending their regime, they studied the state constitution and they saw which ones work and didn't. massachusetts put his concentration to a vote so let's put our constitution to a vote. most of the constitutions have three branches of government. let's go at that. most of them have bicamera
. former assistant of commerce for george h.w. bush and special assistant to ronald reagan. not the best image management. you specialize in crisis management. some compare to marie antoine e antoinette. all these cuts coming on and he's walking around smoking a stogy. >> a woman is a woman, because good cigar is a smoke, i say. >> you you may say that, but doesn't go down very well. >> you can't smoke inside, so i guess he figured he had to take the opportunity. it probably isn't the best image for a national figure to be smoking at all let along in public, let alone during a crisis, let alone on the streets of man hat continue. let's put a positive spin on it. perhaps it is his way of helping control his nerves. >> this is a prime minister that come and has promised all sorts of things when he got elected. once that starts happening, how on earth do you control it from a crisis management pr perspective? >> if we could control it, we'd all be rich. what we tried to do, what i'm sure his advisers are trying to do is to keep him cool, keep him focused. they've made a lot of announcement
, location services and commerce game. they're bringing proprietary app. that is big thing. lori: android razr, iphone 5 next week. is the market shaking up little bit for these smartphones? is apple, can the lumina product be an iphone killer, if you will or will we see the pie split up into more even pieces? >> i think it will work more like the xbox than a real home run. what i mean by that, they stuck with it, kept delivering, innovated over time to become a competitive product. i think that is what will happen here. but the market is pretty much consolidating. i don't think there is a lot of room for a lot of new entrants coming in. if you're not in the market by 2013 and not established it will be difficult. lori: you're still on board with microsoft entering into the mobile device marketplace. this strategy of hosting this event today, so apple-like . what do you think of that strategy? high security. ballmer make as surprise appearance. trying to be wannabes to apple, right. >> right. i don't know if it is wannabes, what the market responds to. the market responds to flash, it res
for the company? is this the reaping for all of the things they have sown over the past few years? >> e-commerce is only 20% and amazon is forward position for that. i think it is early as far as retailers are concerned and i think the heavy investments over the past two, three years, you're starting to reap the benefits of that. you're seeing that in the financial results more so in the top line but i think you will see that in the back half of 2013 when you start to see margin expansion. >> are your target is 400. >> it is 400. >> and, aaron, do you feel the same way? >> we have a market perform right now. we do like the fundamental outlook for amazon although it is currently 70 times or 2013 earnings and we think it is pricey a lot of the positives at these levels so we would wait for a lower entry point. >> valuation a concern at all. >> right now the stock is trading 26 times cash multiple and grows loes to 40% so trading at diskupter free cash flow growth so not a concern for me. i think amazon is in the position as i said in terms of e-commerce. you have seen it being transformational and
chamber of commerce, the african studies program and the other school of public affairs at seattle university's asian studies and global african studies program. as we do about our offense in order to reach a larger audience than the one here tonight, we are going to be tweaking this event from seattle. the hash tag will be moyo whack. so if you are on twitter, join, ask questions coming days. we believe they are critical to developing a better understanding of the world and invite you to participate in the conversation. we will between open q&a for two nights event that we have volunteers who will pass around a wireless microphone. we do also have notecards available if you prefer to write down your question and pass it to a volunteer to ask for you. moderating tonight's q&a will be dr. anand yang, professor of international studies and history at the university of washington. between 2002 and 2010, he was the director of the header and jackson school of international studies. prior to joining university of washington, he taught at sweet briar college and the university of utah, w
, they could be the world's e-commerce bank, the hub of digital transactions around the world. that would be exciting stuff. my guess is they'll try to get their house in order on the advertising and search side and hopefully build from there in an aggressive way. >> mike fertik will sticking around for another block and we have somebody coming up who knows a lot about yahoo!. >> knows a lot. >> we'll bring in consultant yahoo! board member and former mtv executive and, excuse me, activate founder michael wolf to discuss the future of media, the web and more. top of the hour we've got a big interview with former presidential candidate tim pawlenty. "squawk" is coming back right after this. good morning, michael. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. >>> welcome back, e
with leaders from the chamber of commerce and other business leaders and what they told me, these are their words, not mine -- they are sick and tired of hearing politicians take credit for saving jobs throughout the state of ohio and especially politicians from washington. they believe it's the ingenuity and hard work of men and women with small business owners and small manufacturers here in the state of ohio. that's where the credit is due. >> steve: he's running for state (i understand it's really tight. good luck. >> thank you. >> steve: so ohio is doing well. but one of the worst hit cities, janesville, wisconsin, where paul ryan grew up, what does that tell us about him? the film maker who went out to find out coming up next. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing a stunning work of technology. introducing the entirely new lexus es. and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. and the first-ever es hybrid. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help
to the hispanic commune like he's going to the chamber of commerce and mac a case that his policies will be better for hispanics. >> i'd say you have to good out to latino commune and apologize. of all the stuff he said, this to me is the most offensive. first of all, here's a guy that's worth hundreds of millions of dollars complaining that because he's not of a racial or ethnic minority in this country that he's somehow been treated unfairly. this reinforces the stereotype that a lot of people have that somehow we're giving an unfair advantage to people who are from communities of color. here's a guy who's had all the advantages in the world. >> interesting point. >> hundreds of millions of dollars. what was he thinking to show incredible lack of judgment to do this in front of -- it looks like there are several dozen people in this room. what is this guy thinking? he's run are for president of the united states. >> the good news, it will give us a lot to talk about. margaret hoover, mr. socarides. >>> he'll be join by bay buchanan. >> i think margaret would like to speak on his behalf. can i sp
tech. and the degree to which it can move into other areas of vi industry and commerce and absolutely devastate what already exists there and how many hundreds of companies are under threat. for example, the hotel industry is petrified as to how google develops its travel search capabilities and the sort of economic model that it decides it will impose on the rest of the industry because it's so dominant. this is not just a pandora story. this is going to be replicated time and time again, isn't it? >> yeah. go back to what's going on in maps. there's lots of -- when you're looking at all these worlds colliding and how these devices, meaning phones, smartphones, tablets, these are becoming the central driver of your life. people are using computers, less people are watching tv. these devices are taking over more and more functions of your daily life. as they do that, the idea is, why don't you want to control more of the services that flow every day over these devices when you know how to deliver a great user experience? and so this isn't apple saying, we want to make lots of money in
to a lot of bank stocks, including the commerce bank, italy's unicredit. the news also sending bond yields a little bit lower here. the spanish two-year, take a look at 2921, and the euro having a good week as the shorts continue to get steered out of that position. eu euros a little over 1.29, the netherlands where a general election is underway. that being seen as a test of whether europeans will, in fact, embrace an austerity-lead unionization. >>> speaking of which, let's get to michelle caruso-cabrera who is live in madrid with why on spain may soon ask for a bailout. michelle, good morning. >> reporter: hey there, carl, good morning to you. this morning, the prime minister of spain indicated that he might go to the ecb and ask for their help in lowering interest rates. it's not actually a full-on bailout, but it is something close to it. if you'll recall, back in the last week, he offered countries two choices, you can go get a full bailout, that's fine, or that's something like greece has. you get money, need that money to pay your bills, needs that to make payroll and pay for gover
markets relatively flat in europe overall. still some of the banks have rallied. commerce bank, deutsche bank, of course, tomorrow is going -- where the two co-ceos lay out strategy. that's important for people in new york disgruntled that the libor scandal hit there. an important one to watch tomorrow. we've spoken a lot about china on the program today. see some of those mining stocks rising in london. they are off earlier highs. greece is getting very interesting. troika arrived in athens over the weekend and rejected the $12 billion -- 12 billion euros of cuts on the ground there from the coalition party. the negotiations appear quite tense there. what is interesting, and this may have to do with the sort of comments we had out of the germans again over the weekend suggesting that a greek exit from the eurozone is not palatable, not what berlin wants. it's the degree to which some of the greek stocks again today have rallied. again, off our highs. the national bank of greece has done well. a lot of the banks in greece are doing well as people get more optimistic about the stability o
on the energy commerce committee, so i agree. i can see how energy regulation can be hurtful to job creation. there is no question we need to deregulate. do we keep the american people safe? of course we want to do that. but how do we battle this in a way that grows the economy? that can be done. the administration over the last four years has tried to artifically tried to move the market through mechanisms that have not been on track with true market conditions. i think energy is the prime example of that. i come from a very expensive energy state, california. very expensive state all together. many would say the legislature in california doesn't do a whole lot of things right. but i'm fearing that washington has been going more or less sacramento would be a huge mistake. 435 members of the house of representatives and the members of the senate, we can do it all and we should do it all. >> i think the markets the american people need confidence. i think changes need to be made that will grow the economy. i think romney represents a pro-growth economy. if you don't get that confidence out of
, for at the time constitutional reasons. at that point they didn't realize that the commerce clause of the constitution was not very relevant, they still worried about that, and that's why the program was designed that way, and that's one of the reasons it's so difficult to get states to often cooperate with the federal government. as has been alluded to, there was a gao study that found, um n fiscal year 2009 nine different federal agencies spent $18 billion to administer 47 different training programs. um, the report points out that almost all federal employment training programs including those with broader missions such as multipurpose block grants overlapped with at least one other program and that they provided similar services to similar populations. so there's just simply a lot of duplicative services being provided, and often times not provided in a very coherent fashion at least, um, from my standpoint as someone -- and i should make clear, there are a lot of people in this room that have worked actively in the department of labor. i'm not one of them, so i defer to them.
, and once the cities get to be a certain density and there's enough commerce, enough population, then in the early part of the 19th century, they get going, and they really take off in 1830s. >> so that's when it's fair to say for the first time that journalism is a business? >> oh, yes. it's clear by then, yeah. >> now, we, as much as people make fun of us for this, think of ourselves as a professional school, and so i have to ask -- >> more power to you. >> when did the notion of journalist as a professional, whatever that means, come on the scene? >> right, right. well, that is still contested terrain in the sense that -- >> you and i both remember going into journalism, guys in the news room who had not gone to college who were upset that the college kids were going into journalism. >> that's right. [laughter] yes, and you still hear that today once in awhile, you know, if you find the right kind of a perp, you can get a ballroom stool argument going over the necessity of journalism's instruction, but, you know, ncht, that apprentice model that you and i came across when we
together. herbert hoover was a great engineer, secretary of commerce. he is elected and 28. think when roosevelt, democrat. secretary of state. i'm sorry, secretary of the navy under wilson. vice presidential candidate that year. >> host: when did the convention stop mattering, or do they matter? >> guest: boy, you know, we have common -- you know, they do matter but -- four years ago, you know, it was almost down to the wire. it was hillary. they were counting the vote after vote. in 1976, reagan and ford, there was still that backroom thing going on. i could tell you some personal tales. pressure being put on people on what i knew, and who ended up saying, oh, have to visit my stepdaughter in south carolina. >> host: greg from massachusetts. go ahead. >> caller: you flash a picture and it looked like his two sons. i perused some old newspapers and i came across a count of the death of his son. you know, i would like you to comment on that incident and how it impacted his presidency. if it did, and i will listen. >> guest: we are coming up on the anniversary. the older son was john co
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